Meet the candidates

September 23, 2019

Check your letterbox because you should have receive your voting papers for the 2019 Local Government Elections.

 

Pest Free Kaipātiki invited all candidates to participate in either a video interview or an online survey to share their views.

 

Here are their responses in alphabetical order:

 

Councillor Candidates

 

Chris Darby - survey

Danielle Grant - video

Grant Gillon - video

Richard Hills - survey

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Candidates

 

Adrian Tyler - video

Andrew Shaw - video

Ann Hartley - video

Anne-Elise Smithson - video

Cindy Schmidt - survey

Melanie Kenrick - video

Paula Gillon - video

Shannon Leilua - survey

 

 

 Chris Darby, Councillor, North Shore

 

Q1

What is your name and the position you are standing for?

 

Chris Darby - Auckland Council, North Shore ward

 

Q2

Do you have a predator trap or bait station on your property?

  • rat trap

  • bait station

  • timms trap (for possum)

  • Other (please specify):

  • Trapinator, DOC 200.

Q3

Have you downloaded the EcoTrack app and are you actively participating in recording predator pulses and weed control?

  • Yes

Q4

What do you like and dislike about the current state of Kaipātiki’s natural environment? What do you think is the biggest environmental concern for Kaipātiki and what actions would you take to resolve it?

 

1. Kauri die-back disease is the biggest challenge.

2. Council's significant investment of the Environmental Targeted Rate is the immediate action, and now underway.

 

Q5

What single environmental project have you led or been involved in that has made the biggest impact in Kaipātiki? and why?

 

Formerly chair of the environmental group - Ngataringa Bay Society.

 

Q6

Kaipātiki is fortunate to have 32% tree canopy cover. However, every day we can hear chainsaws chopping down trees on private land. What is it that you would do to maintain or grow the Kaipātiki Urban Forest canopy?

 

As Planning Committee chair I instigated a comprehensive body of work (now underway) to look into regulatory and non-regulatory means of protecting urns trees. We have also confirmed the Urban Ngahere Strategy. Looking forward I will be seeking significant increases in street tree budgets to create urban shade-ways and wildlife links.

 

Q7

Pest Free Kaipātiki is a community-led initiative to make Kaipātiki Pest Free by 2026. This will require significant coordination and resources to remove pest plants, predators and prevent the further spread of tree disease such as kauri dieback.  If you were elected this term, what are the top three tangible actions you would take to support our 30+ volunteer reserve groups, schools and local street coordinators achieve our community's vision?

 

2026 is a bold and ambitious target. To achieve pest-free status in 7 years collaboration of a significant number of community groups and individuals, supported and funded by Auckland Council and private philanthropy will be necessary. To undertake that;

1. Support the establishment of overarching groups and subsidiary neighbourhood initiatives.

2. Provide foundation funding for groups and ongoing funding for groups where KPIs are met.

3. Support revegetation funding where weed eradication plans require.

 

Q8

Both community volunteers and Council contractors undertake eco-restoration works in our reserves. What are your current thoughts on how they coordinate delivery and what, if anything, would you look to change in the future?

 

Support a greater focus on community co-design initiatives whereby council is a participant and responder rather than prescriber.

 

Q9

Auckland Council recently adopted the Draft Regional Pest Management Plan.  However, many Kaipātiki residents  have told us they don’t believe it has sufficient “teeth” when it comes to enforcing private property owners to remove pest plants on their properties. We know that seeds of some pest plants are windborne, and can travel  farther than the proposed 500m buffer zone which could result in adverse effects to  Significant Ecological Areas. Do you agree or disagree that there are sufficient enforcement rules on private property? Do you agree with the 500m buffer zone?And what would you do, if anything, to address these issues?

 

No there are not sufficient rules at present, but we have made positive start. Buffer zones are weed species dependent, e.g. gorse does not require such a large buffer zone compared to windblown weed seeds.

 

Q10

Kauri trees are a familiar and beloved feature of Kaipātiki. However, they are currently under threat from kauri dieback disease.  Some people assert that the only way to protect kauri trees from dieback is to keep all people and animals well away from the trees.   What is your opinion on this?What would you do to protect our kauri?

 

In some instances it may be necessary to exclude the public, e,g. where there are no formed metal tracks or boardwalks and in others areas it may be appropriate. Ongoing education and interpretive signs will play a key part. Continued support of scientific research programmes into Kauri die-back would be my second equal focus.

 

 

Danielle Grant, Councillor, North Shore

 

 

Grant Gillon, Councillor, North Shore

 

 

Richard Hills, Councillor, North Shore

 

 Q1

What is your name and the position you are standing for?

 

Richard Hills - Councillor North Shore Ward

 

Q2

Do you have a predator trap or bait station on your property?

Other (please specify):

 

No but a halo is coming to my hood and I'll have one soon.

 

Q3

Have you downloaded the EcoTrack app and are you actively participating in recording predator pulses and weed control?

 

Yes

 

Q4

What do you like and dislike about the current state of Kaipātiki’s natural environment? What do you think is the biggest environmental concern for Kaipātiki and what actions would you take to resolve it?

 

I love our native bush, we are surrounded by it, we also have the best tree canopy coverage of any area in Auckland. Our biggest issues are pests, weeds and water quality. These issues are already being resolved by our community and volunteer groups with support from Auckland Council and the Kaipātiki Local Board. We are ramping up the spend and the resource in this area, massive change in the last few years. We need to continue to do more.

 

Q5

What single environmental project have you led or been involved in that has made the biggest impact in Kaipātiki? and why?

 

Last term, when I was on the Local Board we worked with our volunteer groups and organisations such as the Kaipātiki Project and Forest and Bird to create Pest Free Kaipātiki which coordinates, supports and helps fund our amazing local groups to ramp up the work in our neighbourhoods to eradicate pests, weeds and predators from our community to save our bush, kauri and birds and other wildlife.

 

Also this term we increased funding for kauri dieback protection from $3m over ten years to $100m over ten years. We worked with our biodiversity team to secure massive investment in Kaipātiki bush tracks and we are now getting a record number of tracks upgraded and cleaning stations put in, plus regional funding for community groups such as PFK and Beyond the Fence.

 

Q6

Kaipātiki is fortunate to have 32% tree canopy cover. However, every day we can hear chainsaws chopping down trees on private land. What is it that you would do to maintain or grow the Kaipātiki Urban Forest canopy?

 

We have already asked the Government to bring back tree protection rules which were taken away by the previous Government and has caused a lot of damage to our community. We also need more street trees and trees around our waterways, this happening but we need to dramatically increase this work and support Kaipātiki Project and others who are already having many planting days.

 

Q7

Pest Free Kaipātiki is a community-led initiative to make Kaipātiki Pest Free by 2026. This will require significant coordination and resources to remove pest plants, predators and prevent the further spread of tree disease such as kauri dieback.  If you were elected this term, what are the top three tangible actions you would take to support our 30+ volunteer reserve groups, schools and local street coordinators achieve our community's vision?

 

Continue to support funding grants to our community groups. Ensure council community facility and parks teams are well coordinated with local board and volunteer groups and contractors. I would like to see parks and groups have one point of contact. Basically build on what we are doing but make it better. We are further ahead than most areas.

 

Q8

Both community volunteers and Council contractors undertake eco-restoration works in our reserves. What are your current thoughts on how they coordinate delivery and what, if anything, would you look to change in the future?

 

It's working really well in some areas, the staff and contractors are doing their best and getting a lot fo work done alongside our volunteer groups.  Not as great in others areas, or sometimes on more complex issues. We need better support to, especially now we have a lot more funding in the area for this work, we cannot waste the opportunity. Also having one point of contact would be a huge help, I am already advocating for that.

 

Q9

Auckland Council recently adopted the Draft Regional Pest Management Plan.  However, many Kaipātiki residents  have told us they don’t believe it has sufficient “teeth” when it comes to enforcing private property owners to remove pest plants on their properties. We know that seeds of some pest plants are windborne, and can travel  farther than the proposed 500m buffer zone which could result in adverse effects to  Significant Ecological Areas. Do you agree or disagree that there are sufficient enforcement rules on private property? Do you agree with the 500m buffer zone?And what would you do, if anything, to address these issues?

 

Respondent skipped this question

 

Q10

Kauri trees are a familiar and beloved feature of Kaipātiki. However, they are currently under threat from kauri dieback disease.  Some people assert that the only way to protect kauri trees from dieback is to keep all people and animals well away from the trees.   What is your opinion on this?What would you do to protect our kauri?

 

There may be a case for closing off some tracks permanently or rerouting tracks if we cannot provide sufficient protection for our kauri in some reserves. We have got a significant amount of investment coming and work has already started. Community response has been great but we do have a number of people breaching the barriers and walking on closed tracks already. I am proud we have been able to get funding to protect our kauri but it will take an all of community  response to stop the spread.

 

 

 

Adrian Tyler, Kaipātiki Local Board

 

 

Andrew Shaw, Kaipātiki Local Board

 

Ann Hartley, Kaipātiki Local Board

 

   

Anne-Elise Smithson, Kaipātiki Local Board

 

Cindy Schmidt, Kaipātiki Local Board

 

 Q1

What is your name and the position you are standing for?

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

Q2

Do you have a predator trap or bait station on your property?

  • rat trap

 

Q3

Have you downloaded the EcoTrack app and are you actively participating in recording predator pulses and weed control?

  • Yes

 

Q4

What do you like and dislike about the current state of Kaipātiki’s natural environment? What do you think is the biggest environmental concern for Kaipātiki and what actions would you take to resolve it?

 

Like living so close to the bush tracks in my neighbourhood. Dislike the water pollution in the Harbour after heavy rain. The water quality in the auckland harbour is the biggest environmental concern in my opinion. We can all do our bit With household wastewater. However we need our cities storm water systems to support this work.

 

Q5

What single environmental project have you led or been involved in that has made the biggest impact in Kaipātiki? and why?

 

I have yet to be involved in a project in our area. I have been involved with the Oakley cream stream and bush restoration project.

 

Q6

Kaipātiki is fortunate to have 32% tree canopy cover. However, every day we can hear chainsaws chopping down trees on private land. What is it that you would do to maintain or grow the Kaipātiki Urban Forest canopy?

 

I would look to see what other regions are doing and what is working well with their regulations around this.

 

Q7

Pest Free Kaipātiki is a community-led initiative to make Kaipātiki Pest Free by 2026. This will require significant coordination and resources to remove pest plants, predators and prevent the further spread of tree disease such as kauri dieback.  If you were elected this term, what are the top three tangible actions you would take to support our 30+ volunteer reserve groups, schools and local street coordinators achieve our community's vision?

 

Support any education initiatives to support locals in setting up and care for a pest trap on their property, advocate for the allocation of resources to volunteer groups and follow advice from our Kauri protection teams.

 

Q8

Both community volunteers and Council contractors undertake eco-restoration works in our reserves. What are your current thoughts on how they coordinate delivery and what, if anything, would you look to change in the future?

 

I’d have to do some research into this issue.

 

Q9

Auckland Council recently adopted the Draft Regional Pest Management Plan.  However, many Kaipātiki residents  have told us they don’t believe it has sufficient “teeth” when it comes to enforcing private property owners to remove pest plants on their properties. We know that seeds of some pest plants are windborne, and can travel  farther than the proposed 500m buffer zone which could result in adverse effects to  Significant Ecological Areas. Do you agree or disagree that there are sufficient enforcement rules on private property? Do you agree with the 500m buffer zone?And what would you do, if anything, to address these issues?

 

It doesn’t sound like the current buffer zone is enough to protect the landscape. I would like to understand what other options there are around enforcement for removal of pest plants

 

Q10

Kauri trees are a familiar and beloved feature of Kaipātiki. However, they are currently under threat from kauri dieback disease.  Some people assert that the only way to protect kauri trees from dieback is to keep all people and animals well away from the trees.   What is your opinion on this?What would you do to protect our kauri?

 

I would go with the advice of our Kauri protection teams, we are still learning about how this may evolve in our community. It is crucial to take their advice right now.

 

Melanie Kenrick, Kaipātiki Local Board

 

 

Paula Gillon, Kaipātiki Local Board

 

 

 

Shannon Leilua, Kaipātiki Local Board

 

Q1

What is your name and the position you are standing for?

 

Shannon Leilua, Kaipātiki Local Board

 

Q2

Do you have a predator trap or bait station on your property?

  • bait station

  • timms trap (for possum)

 

Q3

Have you downloaded the EcoTrack app and are you actively participating in recording predator pulses and weed control?

  • No

 

Q4

What do you like and dislike about the current state of Kaipātiki’s natural environment? What do you think is the biggest environmental concern for Kaipātiki and what actions would you take to resolve it?

 

I think more can be done, especially to protect our native environment. Need to find more ways we can better look after it.

 

Q5

What single environmental project have you led or been involved in that has made the biggest impact in Kaipātiki? and why?

 

I have not been involved in any project yet. But am keen if I am elected to be able to find strategies and ways we could enter make a difference.

 

Q6

Kaipātiki is fortunate to have 32% tree canopy cover. However, every day we can hear chainsaws chopping down trees on private land. What is it that you would do to maintain or grow the Kaipātiki Urban Forest canopy?

 

We need to be able to give more information about this. Definitely am all for growing more trees .

 

Q7

Pest Free Kaipātiki is a community-led initiative to make Kaipātiki Pest Free by 2026. This will require significant coordination and resources to remove pest plants, predators and prevent the further spread of tree disease such as kauri dieback.  If you were elected this term, what are the top three tangible actions you would take to support our 30+ volunteer reserve groups, schools and local street coordinators achieve our community's vision?

 

We need to have more resources to achieve this. Myself and my wife have a possum trap on our property to catch these pests our 2 trees we have on the property seem to be ruined by the pests but we are doing our bit to help I think more people the better. I realise there are a huge amount of volunteers which is great but think we need to do more and maybe a way is bringing everyone’s ideas together to try and achieve a pest free Kaipātiki.

 

Q8

Both community volunteers and Council contractors undertake eco-restoration works in our reserves. What are your current thoughts on how they coordinate delivery and what, if anything, would you look to change in the future?

 

I think they are amazing at doing this kind of work for our reserves change comes with time and that’s my thoughts, I could say what I want to change now however it might not be suited for when the future comes. It would take a lot of collaboration and to hear from the experts and people within the community.

 

Q9

Auckland Council recently adopted the Draft Regional Pest Management Plan.  However, many Kaipātiki residents  have told us they don’t believe it has sufficient “teeth” when it comes to enforcing private property owners to remove pest plants on their properties. We know that seeds of some pest plants are windborne, and can travel  farther than the proposed 500m buffer zone which could result in adverse effects to  Significant Ecological Areas. Do you agree or disagree that there are sufficient enforcement rules on private property? Do you agree with the 500m buffer zone?And what would you do, if anything, to address these issues?

 

Respondent skipped this question

 

Q10

Kauri trees are a familiar and beloved feature of Kaipātiki. However, they are currently under threat from kauri dieback disease.  Some people assert that the only way to protect kauri trees from dieback is to keep all people and animals well away from the trees.   What is your opinion on this? What would you do to protect our kauri?

 

I am not a expert in this area but will do my best to find ways that our native Kauri can survive. Maybe keeping people and animals maybe one way of protecting but we could definitely research if there are other ways we could do to protect.

 

 


 

 

 

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